Social aspects of educational mobility in rural South Africa


Date & time
Tue 21 Sep 2021, 4:00pm to 5:00pm

Speaker

Mr Shao-Tzu Yu, PhD Candidate, School of Demography, ANU

 

Location

Zoom ID: 813 8432 5598 P/W 276173
 

‘This PhD project aims to further the extant literature on intergenerational social mobility by using a life course and network approach to study the underlying mechanisms that shape the emergence of educational inequality throughout the post-apartheid era.’

For more details see:

https://demography.cass.anu.edu.au/events/social-aspects-educational-mobility-rural-south-africa

ANU’s National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health (NCEPH) and Africa

Professor Banks Emily has been made a member of the Order of Australia, largely for her work on cardiovascular disease and on cancer. In addition, according to The Canberra Times “Her research which showed female genital mutilation was associated with increasing risks for mothers and babies was used as evidence for a United Nations resolution on the subject”. Professor Banks was the lead author in this study: Banks, E, Meirik, O, Farley, T et al 2006, ‘Female genital mutilation and obstetric outcome: WHO collaborative prospective study in six African countries’, Lancet, The (UK edition), vol. 367, pp. 1835-1841.

And also she was a co-author in Shah, T, Grieg, J, van der Plas, L et al 2016, ‘Inpatient signs and symptoms and factors associated with death in children aged 5 years and younger admitted to two Ebola management centres in Sierra Leone, 2014: A retrospective cohort study’, The Lancet Global Health, vol. 4, no. 7, pp. E495-E501.

Associate Professor Kamalini Lokuge’s projects include 

See: https://rsph.anu.edu.au/people/academics/associate-professor-kamalini-lokuge

Dr Chaturangi Yapa

Dr Chaturangi’s research in Northern Nigeria is available at: https://openresearch-repository.anu.edu.au/handle/1885/202969

One or Dr Yapa’s  research questions was how the key concepts of Primary Health Care (PHC) applied in a Humanitarian Emergency?  She used field visits to Medecins sans Frontieres (MSF) projects in northern Nigeria and Lebanon as case studies to answer this research question. “In northern Nigeria, a visit and realist analysis of a   (MSF)maternal health care project highlighted the importance of understanding the ‘context’ of an intervention, particularly the role of PHC in comprehensively addressing maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity.”

Dr Dorothy Ononokpono

Dr Ononokpono was a Caldwell Fellow (see https://rsss.cass.anu.edu.au/news/caldwell-visiting-fellowship-2020-call-applications) Working with Dr Baffour of the School of Demography, ANU, and Dr Alice Richardson of NCEPH, she published ‘Mapping maternal healthcare access in selected West African Countries’ in African Population Studies, 34(1), 2020.

She is also the lead author of ‘Maternal Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa: A
Systematic Review of Measurement, Levels and Determinants’, by Dorothy N. Ononokpono, Bernard Baffour, Nsidibe Usoro and Olukemi Adebola’,  in The Routledge Handbook of African Demography, edited By Clifford O. Odimegwu, Yemi Adewoyin, forthcoming in 2022.