Measuring individual-level multidimensional poverty in South Africa

ANU School of Demography Seminar

Date and Time: Tuesday 20 April 1.30-2.30pm

Location: Room 1.23 RSSS Building and By Zoom (details below)

 Presenter: Dr Helen Suich

Title:  Measuring individual-level multidimensional poverty in South Africa

Abstract:
The Individual Deprivation Measure (IDM) is a gender-sensitive and multidimensional measure of poverty, assessed across 14 economic and social dimensions of deprivation. I this seminar, I will introduce the IDM as an individual measure of multidimensional poverty, and provide highlights from the South African country study. Data was collected from more than 8,500 individuals across South Africa, in 2019. I will provide examples of how this innovative tool can provide rich insights into the different patterns of deprivation, and use the data to highlight some of the important differences in the experiences of men and women and across age groups. I will present data from a range of dimensions which illustrate how individual-level data enriches our understanding of multidimensional poverty and can better inform poverty reduction policies and programmes designed.

Bio:
Helen Suich is an independent researcher, focusing largely on issues of poverty alleviation, rural development and natural resource management, and the design and evaluation of projects and programs designed to achieve these goals. Helen worked as a senior research fellow in the IDM programme at ANU, and led the IDM South Africa Country Study.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://anu.zoom.us/j/89520189486?pwd=NlpFQVRoVFV5YUxzL3pMS1cwT0NnUT09

Meeting ID: 895 2018 9486
Password: 144496

Additional Resources provided by Helen Suich

There are a wide range of resource available for those who are interested in the results of the South African survey and the methods used for the analysis. There are six briefing notes, describing the results for the main sample, as well as the analyses by gender, by age group, by disability status and by rural/urban locality. The sixth summarises the South African country study and the revised data analysis methods. Accompanying documentation includes reports describing the revised methods in detail, as well as providing all of the revised results. A comprehensive report published in May 2020 summarises the initial analysis of both the main sample and the purposive sample, which is available here. There is also a series of videos, one summarising the South African country study, one for the overall results of the main sample, based on the revised analysis methods, and one each describing the results by gender, age, rural/urban locality and disability status.
More information about the ANU-led Indonesia study can be found here.

God, Development, and Technology Transfer: Mediated Ethics between Chinese and Ethiopians

Dr. Liang Chen
Australian Centre on China in the World
Thursday, 22 April 2021, 4.00pm5.30pm

Online and in person, China in the World seminar rooms (Building 188), Fellows Lane, ANU

Details and link to registration here.

Abstract The rolling out of China’s Belt and Road Initiative and overseas projects provides a window to examine the intercultural dynamics between Chinese expats and local communities. Ethiopia, an East African country, has become a strategic partner of China and hosts a growing population of Chinese developers, business people and workers. In this contact zone, assumptions and misassumptions, tentative adjustments, and reevaluation of Chinese and local communities’ relations are abundant to the extent that any culturalist explanation is insufficient to grapple with the Chinese’s evolving ethical experience. This study shows how the Chinese and Ethiopians relate to one another ethically in different contexts and why the boundary between them becomes explicit or less so.

Bio Dr Liang Chen’s research interests involve migration, urbanisation, and intercultural encounters in China and Africa. He has been studying the trans-continental business network of African expatriates in China, the Chinese working in Ethiopia, and Afar pastoralists’ urbanisation in Ethiopia and Djibouti since 2016. He is currently visiting the School of Culture, History, and Language of ANU.

Seminar on Implications for Agricultural Research for Development in Southern Africa

Public Seminar: History matters – Implication for Agricultural Research for Development in Southern Africa

Speaker: Henning Bjornlund, Research Professor in Water Policy and Management at University of South Australia. Since 2013 he has worked on a Research for Development project funded by ACIAR and lead by ANU

Date: 1pm, Thursday 29 Apr 2021

Venue: Frank Fenner Seminar Room
141 Linnaeus Way, Acton ACT 2601,

Also available online via Zoom

For more information and to register go to 

https://fennerschool.anu.edu.au/news-events/events/public-seminar-history-matters-%E2%80%93-implication-agricultural-research-development