A public panel discussion, ‘State fragility and how to escape it’,

A public panel discussion, ‘State fragility and how to escape it’, will be held on Friday 29 November 4:30-6pm, at Molonglo Theatre, Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU

For more details including registration see https://devpolicy.crawford.anu.edu.au/department-news/15492/state-fragility-and-how-escape-it?utm_source=Devpolicy&utm_campaign=eaf9a7f704-Devpolicy+News+Dec+15+2017_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_082b498f84-eaf9a7f704-250032321

‘About half of the world’s poor live in fragile and conflict-affected states. The governments in these countries lack the legitimacy and capacity to provide protection and deliver the jobs, public services, and opportunities their people need. The perils of state fragility are not constrained to national boundaries. It also drives mass migration, trafficking and terrorism. However, despite increasing attention by domestic and international actors, the outcomes of interventions in addressing fragility have been mixed and often counterproductive.’

By building on seven in-depth country case studies, three of which are in Africa  (Burundi, Rwanda, Sierra Leone ) the other four being Afghanistan, Lebanon, Pakistan, and Papua New Guinea) and recent developments in the field, this panel discusses dimensions of state fragility and pathways that can help to escape fragility. This event is part of an ongoing research project on state fragility at the Development Policy Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU.

Panellists are:

Dr Nematullah Bizhan, Lecturer at the Development Policy Centre, ANU.

Saku Akmeemana,  Principal Specialist for Governance,  Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

Dr Bilal Malaeb,  postdoctoral researcher at the Institute of Global Affairs at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

The panel will be chaired by Professor Stephen Howes, Professor of Economics and Director of the Development Policy Centre, ANU

AFSAAP 2019

AFSAAP Conference 2019
“Africa: Diversity and Development”, 26 – 27 November 2019

University of Otago campus

Sessions in the draft program include:
Historical Perspectives, Education, Conservation and Inclusivity, African Migrants in Australia, Politics, Literacy and Language, Livelihoods and Food, Security, Health, Geopolitics, Culture, Art and Literature,
Peace and Conflict, Migration and Health, Mining, Development Issues;
Gender/Sexuality: Violence and Activism, Development, Land Politics,
Tourism.

Roundtable Panel: ‘Australian Mining Interests in Africa’.

Workshop: ‘Creating an online
glossary/wiki for terms that reflect African ways of knowing, being and
doing human rights’

KEYNOTE LECTURES
Marcelle Dawson: “Some of my Best Friends are White’: Allies and Affinities in African Studies”
Bob Huish: “The Place of “Past Oncologies” in Global Health Today: Chronicles of Cancer in Africa”
Elizabeth Rankin: “Monumental Manipulations: Reshaping Visual Heritage in South Africa’s Public Domain”

The 2016 Zambian Elections and the Role of the International Community

African Studies Reading Group, Thursday 21 November 17:00
Lady Wilson Room, Sir Roland Wilson Building, 120 McCoy Circuit

THE 2016 ZAMBIAN ELECTIONS AND THE ROLE OF THE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY

Zambia had long been hailed as a model in the region so hopes were (naively) high that the 2016 presidential election was going to be undertaken in the true spirit of democracy – but that was not to be. This presentation describes how various actions taken by the ruling party appeared to have been copied directly from a “Dictator’s Handbook” on “how to rig an election”, just as used in other countries, including Uganda and Zimbabwe. A charade was played out, of pretending to follow international standards while at the same time, and often in plain sight, many blatant irregularities and major transgressions against accepted electoral practices occurred. There were also abuses of constitutional processes after the elections. The result was the end of the Rule of Law in Zambia.

The role of the international community before, during and after the elections is described and analysed and an attempt is made to explain why  observer mission “referees” handed out the equivalent of “yellow” and even “green” cards,  in stark contrast to the international commentators who produced “red cards”.  It was as if they had officiated at different games.

Margaret O’Callaghan is a Canberra-based independent scholar, former Visiting Fellow at ANU’s Crawford School of Public Policy and a former United Nations Population Fund representative to Zambia.

All welcome. Refreshments provided.

“Now I am Dead”: Anthropological Encounters with the Other

WEDNESDAY 04 DEC 2019, 5:30pm–7pm, Lady Wilson Room (2.10)
Sir Roland Wilson Building (#120), ANU
(Note change of date to Wednesday 04 December at 5:30pm)

Now I am Dead (2018) dir. by Philipp Bergmann

“If anthropology is founded on the violence of speaking for others,” anthropologist Isabel Bredenbröker asks in the thought-provoking short film Now I am Dead (2018), “then how can I relate to this?”

Bredenbröker and film director Philipp Bergmann had planned an artistic video installation to explore the nature of the ethnographic encounter through the lens of her research on death in a small town in Ghana. But in the midst of filming, Isabel’s grandfather dies in Germany. Asking the people she encounters for advice about how to react to the death of a far-away family member whilst shooting a film on death in West Africa, the perspective of the foreign researcher is tragicomically inverted and incorporated into a local perspective. The distinctions between the other culture and one’s own, between the Other and the Self get blurred, just as the threshold between life and death becomes something that can be experienced in a playful way.

“This is absurd,” Bredenbröker declares, “but in its absurdity, it makes perfect sense.”

About the presenter: Isabel Bredenbröker is a PhD candidate in the Research Training Group of Value and Equivalence at Goethe University, Frankfurt. Trained as an anthropologist, her research considers the material and economic aspects of death in the Volta Region of Ghana.

Coinciding with the annual conference of the Australian Anthropological Association, the Freilich Project is pleased to host the screening of this unique short film, and a discussion on the perennial challenges of ethical encounters between individuals and cultures in social scientific research.

The film screening and discussion is free and open to all, and will be followed by light refreshments.

Please register for catering purposes.

Robyn Alders renews link with ANU

Robyn Alders renewed her link with the ANU in April, 2019

From https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Robyn_Alders
‘Robyn Alders currently works as a Senior Scientific Advisor at the Centre on Global Health Security at Chatham House, is an Honorary Professor with the Development Policy Centre at the Australian National University and Chair of the Kyeema Foundation. Her current research and development interests include: linkages between food and nutrition security and health security, gender equity, planetary health and science communication.’

Robyn obtained her PhD in Veterinary Immunology at ANU in 1989 before working at the University of Zambia. Her later African experience includes Mozambique and Angola.

2020 Phyllis Montgomerie Commonwealth Award

Applications are invited for the 2020 Royal Commonwealth Society’s Phyllis Montgomerie Commonwealth Award. The award, of up to $5000, is intended to help with expenses, including travel, associated with a research or education project to be conducted in a Commonwealth country, including Australia.

Criteria

There is no restriction on the field of study or endeavour, nor are applications restricted to university students. Projects should have the potential for demonstrable benefit for the subjects of the study and Commonwealth member states. Applications must also include a clear statement of objectives and identifiable outcomes.

Eligibility

To be eligible, applicants must be:

  • Australian citizens
  • Residents of the Australian Capital Territory
  • If students, graduate or higher degree

How to Apply

Online application form and details here.

The closing date for applications is Friday 15 November 2019.

(Note: in previous years all successful applicants have been PhD students at ANU.)

Intra-Party Politics and Conflict in Ghana

African Studies Reading Group, Thursday 24 October, 5 pm.
Lady Wilson Room, Sir Roland Wilson Building, 120 McCoy Circuit, ANU.

Recent studies on democratization and conflicts in Africa have largely focused on civil wars, as well as national, sub-national and local elections. Little attention has been given to conflict and violence as a result of internal processes of political parties. The dynamics of intra-party conflicts differ from those at the national or sub-national levels, and therefore should be treated as a subject in its own right. Political parties in Ghana are beset by intra-party conflict, which poses a significant threat to the democratic development of the country. Drawing on elite interviews and ethnographic observations, this presentation will argue that the struggle for power, the lack of internal democracy, ethnicity, factionalism, and patronage have contributed to intra-party conflicts and violence within Ghana’s two dominant political parties, the National Democratic Congress (NDC) and New Patriotic Party (NPP).Ernest Akuamoah is a PhD student in the School of Politics and International Relations. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Studies (First Class Honours) from the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (Ghana) and a Master of Philosophy in Political Science from the University of Ghana, Legon. His PhD project examines the impact of term limit relaxation on electoral violence.

All welcome, refreshments provided.

Early Career Research Small Grants Scheme

ANU’s Herbert & Valmae Freilich Project for the Study of Bigotry is welcoming applications for the 2019 round of the Early Career Research Small Grants Scheme (for activities to be undertaken in 2020).

Three grants of up to $5000 each will be awarded to emerging scholars to assist research into the causes, the histories and the effects of ethnic, cultural, religious and sexual bigotry and animosity. Applications are open to all Early Career Researchers and PhD Scholars working in Australia, and are due on 15 November.

Full details of the Scheme are available here on the Freilich Project website.

Exhibition: Photography, Race and Slavery: African Sitters of Qajar Era Iran (UNSW, Sydney)

(Ordinarily we restrict posts on this site to events in Canberra, but this fascinating exhibition about a little known aspect of African and African diasporic history is an exception to the rule. -IA)

Photography, Race and Slavery: African sitters of Qajar Era Iran – Seminar and Exhibition Opening

Curated by Dr Pedram Khosronejad (Western Sydney University), this exhibition traces the unexplored history of African slaves in Iran during the Qajar dynasty and looks at the unique relationship between photography and slavery in Iran from 1840s to the 1930s. This exhibition is presented as part of the UNSW Library Exhibitions Program and the Silk Roads@UNSW Research Network Seminar Series in collaboration with the Religion and Society Cluster of Western Sydney University.

UNSW Library, Sydney, 25 September 5:00pm RSVP